Alberta Map
Alberta Map

Introduction

Over its decade-plus of operations, the ABMI has generated a comprehensive dataset on Alberta’s species, their habitats, and the extent and type of human footprint across the province. With this information, the ABMI has developed analyses to predict species' relative abundances and examine species' responses to vegetation and soil types, as well as human footprint in Alberta. These methods have been applied to hundreds of species; this profile provides summary results for one.

Habitat & Human Footprint Associations

Hooded Tube Lichen is most abundant in wooded areas and can be found most often in mixedwood, coniferous and deciduous forests as well as treed fens and shrubby wetlands.

Species-habitat Associations in the Forested Region

Forested Region - Species Habitat Association Graph: Predicted species relative abundance (bars) as a function of vegetation and human footprint type in the forested region. Dots are added to forest types where harvesting occurs and show the predicted species abundance in cutblocks of various ages. Vertical lines represent 90% confidence intervals.

  • Hooded Tube Lichen predicted relative abundance is high in all forest types in the forested region, as well as treed fen and swamp vegetation types.
  • Hooded Tube Lichen relative abundance is low across human footprint types in the forested region.
  • Hooded Tube Lichen abundance is similar or lower in young harvested stands compared to naturally regenerating stands of similar age in the forested region.

Species-habitat Associations in the Prairie Region

Non-Treed Sites in the Prairie Region

Non-Treed Sites in the Prairie Region

Treed Sites in the Prairie Region

Treed Sites in the Prairie Region

Prairie Region - Species Habitat Association Graph: Predicted species relative abundance (bars) in each soil type and human footprint type in the prairie region. Vertical lines indicate 90% confidence intervals. The presence/absence of trees greatly affects the presence and abundance of many species; therefore, separate figures are presented for treed and non-treed sites in the prairie region.

  • Hooded Tube Lichen relative abundance is greater at treed sites than at non-treed sites in the prairie region.
  • Hooded Tube Lichen relative abundance is highest across soil types and uniformly low across human footprint types in the prairie region.

Relationship to Linear Footprint


Relationship to Linear Footprint in the Forested Region



Linear Footprint Graph: Species relative abundance predicted for habitat with no human footprint compared to habitat in which 10% of the area is converted to either soft or hard linear footprint.

  • Hooded Tube Lichen relative abundance is predicted to have a slight negative relationship with soft and hard linear footprints in the forested region.

Relationship to Linear Footprint in the Prairie Region



Linear Footprint Graph: Species relative abundance predicted for habitat with no human footprint compared to habitat in which 10% of the area is converted to either soft or hard linear footprint.

  • Hooded Tube Lichen relative abundance is predicted to have a slight positive relationship with soft linear footprint and a slight negative relationship with hard linear footprint in the prairie region.

Impacts of Human Footprint

Hooded Tube Lichen relative abundance tends to be lower than expected in habitats changed by human activities. Activities that remove trees from the landscape generally have the greatest effect because trees are the substrate Hooded Tube Lichen most commonly grows on.

Human Footprint Effects in the Forested Region

Under-footprint Sector Effects

Human Footprint Effects in the Forested Region

Figure: Under-footprint Effects. Percentage change in Hypogymnia physodes relative abundance inside areas that have been disturbed by each sector in the forested region. Dot above bar indicates change in abundance is greater than 100%. Refer to value above or below the bar for the estimated under-footprint effect.

To understand how the Hypogymnia physodes is impacted by specific development activities, the under-footprint figure shows how Hypogymnia physodes relative abundance is predicted to change within each sector's footprint compared to the habitat it replaced (Figure: Under-footprint Effects).

  • Hooded Tube Lichen relative abundance is predicted to be lower than expected in all human footprint types compared to the habitat each footprint replaces in the forested region.

Regional Sector Effects

Human Footprint Effects in the Prairie Region

Figure: Regional Sector Effects. Percentage change in Hypogymnia physodes relative abundance throughout the forested region due to the respective footprints of each sector. Refer to value above or below the bar for the estimated regional effect.

The Regional Sector Effects graph shows the predicted change in the total relative abundance of the Hypogymnia physodes across the forested region due to each sector's footprint, considering the: area of the footprint in the region, under-footprint effect, and habitat types impacted by a particular sector (Figure: Regional Sector Effects).

  • Total population effects on Hooded Tube Lichen were small for all industrial sectors in the forested region.

Human Footprint Effects in the Prairie Region

Under-footprint Sector Effects

Human Footprint Effects in the Prairie Region

Figure: Under-footprint Effects. Percentage change in Hypogymnia physodes relative abundance inside areas that have been disturbed by each sector in the prairie region. Dot above bar indicates change in abundance is greater than 100%. Refer to value above or below the bar for the estimated under-footprint effect.

To understand how the Hypogymnia physodes is impacted by specific development activities, the under-footprint figure shows how Hypogymnia physodes relative abundance is predicted to change within each sector's footprint compared to the habitat it replaced (Figure: Under-footprint Effects).

  • Hooded Tube Lichen relative abundance is predicted to be lower than expected in all human footprint types compared to the habitat each footprint replaces in the prairie region.

Regional Sector Effects

Human Footprint Effects in the Prairie Region

Figure: Regional Sector Effects. Percentage change in Hypogymnia physodes relative abundance throughout the prairie region due to the respective footprints of each sector. Refer to value above or below the bar for the estimated regional effect.

The Regional Sector Effects graph shows the predicted change in the total relative abundance of the Hypogymnia physodes across the prairie region due to each sector's footprint, considering the: area of the footprint in the region, under-footprint effect, and habitat types impacted by a particular sector (Figure: Regional Sector Effects).

  • Total population effects on Hooded Tube Lichen at the regional scale were small for most industrial sectors except agriculture, because the respective footprints of each sector were small.
  • The agriculture footprint has the strongest negative population effect on Hooded Tube Lichen relative abundance because it has the largest area in the prairie region.

Predicted Relative Abundance

Hooded Tube Lichen can be found growing in every natural region in Alberta; it is most common in the Boreal Forest, Foothills and Canadian Shield Natural Regions.

Reference Conditions

  • The reference condition shows the predicted relative abundance of the Hooded Tube Lichen after all human footprint had been backfilled based on native vegetation in the surrounding area.

Current Conditions

  • The current condition is the predicted relative abundance of the Hooded Tube Lichen taking current human footprint (circa 2016) into account.

Difference Conditions

  • Hooded Tube Lichen relative abundance is predicted to be lower under current conditions compared to reference conditions in much of the Parkland and Foothills Natural Regions, as well as localized areas of the Boreal Forest Natural Region.

Other Issues

Hooded Tube Lichen has a large geographic range and grows on every continent except for Antarctica (McFarlin 1991). Hooded Tube Lichen is a tolerant species and can grow in regions with relatively high levels of air pollutants such as sulphuric dioxide (Landis et al. 2019).

References & Credits

References & Credits

Landis, M. S., W. B. Studabaker, J. P. Pancras, J. R. Graney, K. Puckett, E. M. White, and E. S. Edgerton. 2019. Source apportionment of an epiphytic lichen biomonitor to elucidate the sources and spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta, Canada. Science of the Total Environment 654:1241-1257.

McFarlin, M. 1991. A Morphological and Chemical Study of the Lichen Genus Hypogymnia in North America North of Mexico. Honors Projects Illinois Wesleyan University: Paper 29.

Data Sources

Data collected by ABMI.

Photo Credits

Diane Haugland

Recommended Citation

Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute. 2019. Hooded Tube Lichen (Hypogymnia physodes). ABMI Website: abmi.ca/home/data-analytics/biobrowser-home/species-profile?tsn=99002237.

Additional ABMI Resources

Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute. 2016. ABMI Species Website Manual, Version: 2016-12-02. Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute, Alberta, Canada. Report available at: abmi.ca.

Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute. 2014. Manual for Species Modeling and Intactness, Version 2014-09-25. Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute, Alberta, Canada. Report available at: abmi.ca.

Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute. 2014. Terrestrial field data collection protocols (abridged version) 2016-05-18. Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute, Alberta, Canada. Report available at: abmi.ca.

Download ABMI Species and Habitat Data.

View ABMI Collaborations.

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for testing profile: [{QALog=

Hayley Submitted March-04-2019

Diane Haughland Edited March-26-2019

Kat Villeneuve edited May 31, 2019.

Kat Villeneuve updated BB Sept 4, 2019.

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Hooded Tube Lichen is a white to grey leaf-like lichen that grows on trees and downed wood. In Alberta, Hooded Tube Lichen can be found in every natural region, but is most common in the Foothills, Boreal Forest, and Canadian Shield Natural Regions.

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Hooded Tube Lichen has a large geographic range and grows on every continent except for Antarctica (McFarlin 1991). Hooded Tube Lichen is a tolerant species and can grow in regions with relatively high levels of air pollutants such as sulphuric dioxide (Landis et al. 2019).

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Hooded Tube Lichen is most abundant in wooded areas and can be found most often in mixedwood, coniferous and deciduous forests as well as treed fens and shrubby wetlands.

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Hooded Tube Lichen relative abundance tends to be lower than expected in habitats changed by human activities. Activities that remove trees from the landscape generally have the greatest effect because trees are the substrate Hooded Tube Lichen most commonly grows on.

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Hooded Tube Lichen can be found growing in every natural region in Alberta; it is most common in the Boreal Forest, Foothills and Canadian Shield Natural Regions.

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Landis, M. S., W. B. Studabaker, J. P. Pancras, J. R. Graney, K. Puckett, E. M. White, and E. S. Edgerton. 2019. Source apportionment of an epiphytic lichen biomonitor to elucidate the sources and spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta, Canada. Science of the Total Environment 654:1241-1257.

McFarlin, M. 1991. A Morphological and Chemical Study of the Lichen Genus Hypogymnia in North America North of Mexico. Honors Projects Illinois Wesleyan University: Paper 29.

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KVI added sector effects text.

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Diane Haugland

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